Shout out to Sistah rikyrah

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Our beloved Sistah rikyrah has branched out and hooked up with the brothas and sistahs of Mirror on America blog.  She has written an excellent post on Michelle Obama.  Y’all show a sistah some luv.

It seems that Sistah rikyrah isn’t the only one who’s been noticing Barack’s biggest and most effective booster.  The Associated Press has noticed in two prominent stories here and here in which the other Harvard Law grad effortlessly fields questions and sells her candidate in New Hampshire. 

When asked by a voter why she should vote for Michelle’s hubby, sistah Michelle stepped up and said, “He’s a man who has put his values before his profit,” she said. “He’s not running for president because he wants to be president. That’s sort of the irony in it. He’s running for president because he believes we can do better as a country.”  According to the AP, they gave a sistah a standing O.   

As aluded to by Sistah rikyrah, the 21st century Huxtables present a very compelling presence to cerebral and flinty New Hampshire. Style over substance works every time; now let’s see if it will work on us.  As of this writing, he’s behind.

58 thoughts on “Shout out to Sistah rikyrah

  1. rikyrah

    dblehelix,

    I knew that they were forced to recruit White students…not much of a surprise to me, considering the (In)Justice Department that we have.

  2. Rikyrah: That’s wonderful. I’m getting ready to scurry over there and check you out. But I don’t have to wonder if it’s good. I already know it is.

    BTW… Do me a favor and elaborate on your idea of testamonials. I think that would be great. You can post it under the comments or just shoot me a e-mail. bradenspeaks@houston.rr.com

  3. Rick

    “As of this writing, he’s behind” – SB

    Those Gallop poll numbers were very interesting, but not too surprising – particularly the stats showing Obama doing better among blacks with more formal education and higher incomes; less well among blacks with fewer socio-economic resources. Hillary is doing better there.

    Perhaps the unveiling of Obama’s universal health care plan will help give him more momentum; or maybe his proposal to roll back Bush’s tax cut for the rich in order to help pay for his healthcare plan will have a positive impact…? Did anyone have any thoughts about his plan?

  4. NMP

    Rick/SB

    Yes, he’s 8 percentage points behind nationally in the latest Rasmussen poll, but he’s doing well in Iowa (ahead of Hillary) and in New Hampshire where he’s running a close 2nd. In the latest poll I saw from SC, he was leading. Has that changed?

    The big news is that he’s the ONLY Democratic contender leading ALL GOP contenders. This will be a big test for how truly racially progressive the Democratic party claims to be. In 400 years, this country has only elected 2 Black governors and 5 US Senators. Only 7 Blacks elected statewide! To date, 35 women (34 White and 1 Black) have been elected to the US Senate and 29 White women have served as governor in 22 states. It’s no longer a question of whether America is ready to electe a female President, but rather is it ready to elect Hillary Clinton? However, there is still an open question of whether America, including Black America, is ready for an African American President, not just Barack Obama. Will the Democratic Party pick Hillary over Barack despite her low polling in head-to-head match-ups because it’s not willing to embrace its own rhetoric?

  5. NMP: I love reading your posts. (smile)

    OT: I’m pleased to announce that I got the job that I interviewed for a couple of weeks ago. I’m so happy!

    For those that wished me well, thanks so much for your kind words and encouragement. God bless…

    Angie

  6. NMP

    dblhelix,

    The loopholes for White “affirmative action” at HBCU’s have long been inexistence. The demographic to watch are Latinos. They are expected to outnumber Blacks at a number of HBCU’s in the next decade or two, bringing both the mission and continued financial support from the Black community into question.

  7. NMP

    Angie,

    I’m so happy for you; it’s more than deserved! I’m sorry I can only give you a virtual hug, but it’s a big one!

  8. NMP

    rikyrah,

    I forgot to add…if I didn’t need more evidence that you are truly representing sistahs WELL in the blogosphere, I see that you’ve posted a pic of W.E.B. DuBois arguably one of the two greatest minds this country has produced and one of the few individuals in my pantheon of greatest people in history. I’ll keep the 2nd to myself as it always sparks an argument.

  9. It’s damn near EMBARASSING to see Hillary running for President and actually LEADING in the polls. What a sham she is. And who are these black people that are supporting her? I don’t know ANY blacks supporting Hillary!!!!

  10. rikyrah

    Angie,

    Congrats! That’s great:)

    And, I want to thank everyone for the positive thoughts.🙂

  11. NMP

    Big J, I haar you!

    I consider myself a relatively insightful person, not the most, but I hold my own. And for the life of me, I just DON’T get this sudden kinship Black women have with Hillary Clinton. I don’t know if it’s the Clinton mystique or a confluence of it along with new found gender identity? I’m just at a loss to understand this. I don’t know any Black woman who ranks gender over race. In fact, most Black women I know, of every socio-economic level, harbor varying degrees of resentment towards the relative ease with which society allows White women to excel. They may hit a glass ceiling on the upper floors, but it’s a far cry from the basement. As a community, they don’t share our professional, health or educational struggles by any measure. If they woke up tomorrow as White men, their socio-economic stations would undoubtedly improve, but if Black women became Black men, our lives would probably take a swift downward turn.

    So where’s the shared struggle that would convince Black women to pull a lever for Hillary over Obama all other things being equal?

    I know the Clintons are good at convincing (fooling) Black folks that they “share our pain” and best suited (than ourselves) to lead (oversee) us (out of welfare and into jails), but this is a stretch to me!

  12. Rick

    “However, there is still an open question of whether America, including Black America, is ready for an African American President, not just Barack Obama.” — NMP

    NMP: I’m still wrestling with those Gallop poll numbers showing more of a disconnect between Obama and blacks who are relatively more disenfranchised vis-a-vis their more well-off black counterparts. To me, this raises questions of Obama’s ability to appeal to blacks across the class spectrum — a topic than can get (easily be) skirted over when focusing on matters such as “racial solidarity”.

    I think the question of whether “black america” is ready for a black president was at least partially addressed in 1988 when Jesse Jackson got 92% of the black vote in the democratic primaries. Jesse also ran a campaign much more focused on the poor relative to what Obama is doing now — an observation Ernesto also made recently.

    At the end of the day, it’s about appeal.

  13. NMP,
    White women in general and Hillary in particular ain’t feelin’ our collective pain as black people. That’s what was so compelling about the law review article I read and why I posted the Mistress Condi piece. What history has shown us time and time again, is that white women will choose to elevate gender over race almost every time.
    Also, America is ambivalent about both race and gender, which, makes the competition between Barack and Hillary so pregnant with tension and so damn funny and interesting to watch.
    I don’t know about Y’all, but I am ready for America to slip back into its periennial pattern of racial reflexivity towards Obama and skeptism toward Hillary once it realizes that either have the best shot at actually being Preznit.

  14. Rick,

    You raised some interesting questions about the class divide in the African American community and Barack Obama’s seeming inability to bridge it. He will bridge it if, and only if he comes off of the politics of white middle class pretension and gets REAL.

    Being a Skeptical Brotha by nature, you and I both know that ain’t gonna happen anytime soon. He needs to stoke the fires of white middle class absolution in order to win.

  15. NMP

    Rick,

    Jessie ran at a time when the majority of African Americans were still struggling to gain middle class status, so effectively Jesse “poor peoples'” campaign, for lack of a better term, was literally speaking to the masses. 20 years have since past, and the vast majority of African Americans are well within the middle class. I can’t help but wonder how his message would resonate today, especially in light of his personal failings and the media’s succesful reduction of him to a caricature.

    I agree with you about appeal, but I still think there is this widespread false perception within many parts of the African American Community, particularly those at the bottom rung who can’t seem to catch a break, that the Clintons brought salvation, effectively giving them credit for our self-made success. When you hear poor Black folks talk about the legacy of Bill Clinton and the prospect of Hillary Clinton presiding over HIS third term effectively, it sounds eerily like they are anticipating the second coming.

  16. NMP

    Rick,

    Jessie ran at a time when the majority of African Americans were still struggling to gain middle class status, so effectively Jesse “poor peoples'” campaign, for lack of a better term, was literally speaking to the masses. 20 years have since past, and the vast majority of African Americans are well within the middle class. I can’t help but wonder how his message would resonate today, especially in light of his personal failings and the media’s succesful reduction of him to a caricature. If Jesse were running today against the Clinton machine, I have NO doubt that he too would be struggling for Black support. In a recent poll, Black folks ranked Bill Clinton higher than Nelson Mandela, Jesse, Al, and Minister Farrakhan. God forbid Dr. King, The Honorable Thurgood Marshall or beloved Malcolm was on the list…it would have been a disturbing wake up call to learn that Clinton out ranks them as well.

    I agree with you about appeal, but I still think there is this widespread false perception within many parts of the African American Community, particularly those at the bottom rung who can’t seem to catch a break, that the Clintons brought salvation, effectively giving them credit for our self-made success. When you hear poor Black folks talk about the legacy of Bill Clinton and the prospect of Hillary Clinton presiding over HIS third term effectively, it sounds eerily like they are anticipating the second coming.

  17. Rick

    “He will bridge it if, and only if he comes off of the politics of white middle class pretension and gets REAL” – Skeptical Brother

    And risk losing white votes? That’s the dilemma…You nailed it!

  18. NMP,

    You’ve raised some interesting issues of self-esteem and leadership credibility in the black community that should be explored in greater depth. We truly don’t have credible leadership anymore that can be trusted to advocate for the full panoply of black issues. I probably should address that in a post after a period of research and reflection. It says a lot about us and our so-called leadership cadre that we really ain’t got nobody down in our corner.

  19. rikyrah

    The big news is that he’s the ONLY Democratic contender leading ALL GOP contenders. This will be a big test for how truly racially progressive the Democratic party claims to be

    You know, I find this stuff fascinating. In actual poll to poll results – not theoretical, with people have actual candidates, he leads. I swear this stuff is absolute candy for political junkies like myself.

    Will the Democratic Party pick Hillary over Barack despite her low polling in head-to-head match-ups because it’s not willing to embrace its own rhetoric?

    Not only her low polling, but poll after poll after poll, which tell us, FLAT OUT, that, even before a primary vote has been cast, nearly FIFTY PERCENT of this country say that they will NEVER vote for her.

    Democrats better get real on that. It’s not a surprise when folks are telling you the truth over a year and a half out. And, the number of NEVER VOTE FOR HER seems to rise with every poll asking that.

  20. rikyrah

    Also, America is ambivalent about both race and gender, which, makes the competition between Barack and Hillary so pregnant with tension and so damn funny and interesting to watch.
    I don’t know about Y’all, but I am ready for America to slip back into its periennial pattern of racial reflexivity towards Obama and skeptism toward Hillary once it realizes that either have the best shot at actually being Preznit.

    I’m on this ride with you. I love all the mess that this Presidential campaign is bringing out, quite frankly on both sides of the aisle.

    I’ve said it before; I don’t know of a Black Obama supporter that believes race isn’t an issue.

    I honestly DO NOT KNOW if America is ready for a Black President; all I say is that I want the answer to the question.

  21. rikyrah,

    I want the answer too, but I know for a fact that I won’t like it. I also know that I am not ready for my peers and others to tell me for the next fifty years that they voted for Barack Obama and that we’re “even” now.

  22. Rick

    >“…but I still think there is this widespread false perception within many parts of the African American Community, particularly those at the bottom rung who can’t seem to catch a break, that the Clintons brought salvation, effectively giving them credit for our self-made success. When you hear poor Black folks talk about the legacy of Bill Clinton and the prospect of Hillary Clinton presiding over HIS third term effectively, it sounds eerily like they are anticipating the second coming.” — NMP

    NMP: I basically agree with most of what you said. The only comment I’d make is about your point regarding the vast majority of African Americans being in the middle class.
    Black urban poverty is still here, and my concern is that this segment of the population has few champions willing to speak with the desired level of force and clarity on their behalf on a national level. Yes, Obama speaks to me in 2007 (as those Gallop poll numbers suggest they should). But as a black man, I also can’t forget where I was back in 1988…i.e., I can’t forget the ISSUES that were of concern to me back then when Jesse’s central campaign message had “mass appeal”.
    I do hear you when you say Bill/HRC may be taking undeserved credit and diverting attention away from black candidates.

  23. Rick,

    The attention that they take is totally underserved. I hope that we’ll understand that before it is too late and start pressuring the candidates-including the inoffensively black Obama, to start addressing our issues-NOW.

  24. Agree with Rick on the middle class thing. I’m now in the middle class (after having to go in the millitary for 3 years to get college money) and I think we need to see the issues that Jesse was running on in 1988 being pushed more than ever now. Things like better schools and health care coverage never go out of style. I saw an article somewhere that listed all the things that could be paid for with the hundreds of billions of dollars that went down the drain in Iraq…it was mindboggling to look at what the American public has let their government get away with recently…actually in these last 27 years. And I include Bill Clinton in that. I can’t name one thing he did to help anybody but his super rich buds.

  25. Rick

    “Things like better schools and health care coverage never go out of style.”

    Cosign, Ernesto. Also, throw in more funding and govt grants so that folks with limited funds who are aspiring to go to college can have more opportunities to do so. the cost of higher education is a whole lot more than what it was back in 1988, but govt monies available (that don’t have to be paid back, like Pell Grants) have not risen at the same rate.

    regarding healthcare, exactly. This is why I plan to take a very hard look at Obama’s newly unveiled healthcare plan to see if it would meet our community’s needs. i’m no healthcare expert. far from it. which is why any plan would need to be comprehensible — as well as comprehensive — so that regular people can understand it (not like Bush’s medical prescription program which was a confusing hot mess).

    SB: Agree, we need to hold the candidates accountable! No question about that.

    This question was going to be asked sooner or later, so we might as well get it out of the way now! Some of us may have even thought it but were afraid to put it out there…here goes!

    Question: Assume Hillary gets the nomination. Also assume Obama is NOT on the Democratic ticket as HRC’s running mate (she doesn’t ask him; he doesn’t accept offer, whatever). ***Will/Should Obama run for president under the Independent Party ticket ala Lieberman’s Senate bid in Ct?***

    My Short answer: WILL NOT because he would not want to be alienated from the Democratic party base and apparatus.

    but…he SHOULD because Hillary is not likely to win a national election.

    (just to clarify, I think Obama running on an independent ticket is a low probability wildcard scenario, but sometimes the 1% chance wildcard scenario happens.)

  26. NMP

    Rick,

    Sorry for the “Johnie Come Lately Reply’, but the site was acting like an insensitive lover yesterday. Anyway, you’re absolutely right that Obama is not polling well among poor or “downward” Blacks, but that’s a relatively minute sub-set, so they probably represent a one percentage point difference. He is polling extremely well among Black men across the socio-economic spectrum; however, (and that’s a big however) Clinton is beating him soundly among Black women as a whole. Black women are in fact the largest sub-set of the Democratic Party; they are effectively the 8 percent gap.

  27. NMP

    Oh, I almost forgot. Michelle Obama is doing her first prime time news interview tonight on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams. I put my DVR on record this morning!🙂

  28. rikyrah

    I dont’ think he should run on an Independent ticket.

    PS-I have the DVR ready for Michelle too.🙂

  29. Rick

    “Sorry for the “Johnie Come Lately Reply’, but the site was acting like an insensitive lover yesterday.” — NMP

    LOL! NMP, you are a mess🙂

    It’s interesting from the observation you mentioned in post37 that while Obama is doing well among black men, HRC is doing better than Obama among black women. that’s fascinating.

    will also be watching Michelle tonight!

  30. rikyrah

    Watched the NBC Nightly News Profile….

    You all have me obsessed with her hair now…LOL

    I still say leave her alone.

    I gotta say, I still crack up at the image of her in Podunk Iowa or New Hampshire, being the only spec of pepper in a sea of salt.🙂

  31. dblhelix

    rikyrah: Saw that H1-B bill earlier – I do plan to write Mikulski, and for the first time, Cardin on this. I hope others do as well.

  32. Rick

    “He [Obama] is polling extremely well among Black men across the socio-economic spectrum; however, (and that’s a big however) Clinton is beating him soundly among Black women as a whole. Black women are in fact the largest sub-set of the Democratic Party; they are effectively the 8 percent gap.”

    NMP: sorry for the delayed response. I replied yesterday, but my response never made it through.

    In a nutshell, I wonder if your observation is reflective of a a “gender bias” (i.e. black females’ support for another female candidate). it’s clear to me if Michelle was running, black women would support her run…But if she were running against Bill Clinton, would black men tend to favor Michelle or Bill? Hmmmm…that would make for an interesting poll indeed.

    Now that I think about it, I know plenty of black women who support Hillary. It has absolutely nothing to do with the fact they think the Clintons are the Messiahs who have saved the black community — so that hypothesis, however tempting and seductive, doesn’t satisfactorily explain their behavior.

    Recalling my conversations with these women, they like Hillary because they can RELATE to her strength and ability to stand firm in the face of whatever vicious attacks that have come against her. it’s no surprise to me that this is something many black women would relate to (irrespective of specific policies).

    as an aside, I once read a study that suggested women (irrespective of race) tend to vote more based on how they “feel” about a candidate (over doing a complete checklist on what a candidate’s specific policies are).

  33. I took a race, class, and gender class in undergrad. A great deal of the research presented to us in class suggestioned that women, regardless of race, are more connected than we think. I don’t quite know if I agree with that. But maybe that’s what’s happening here.

  34. Rick

    Angie, I took a similar class in undergrad in the African American studies Department (when it finally became a “department” as opposed to a “curriculum” — but that’s another story for another day). what i learned is that we each have a “gender identity” which is unique (but of course is not cut off from) our “racial identity.” we read about Frederick Douglass, and books like “Arn’t I a Woman” to get an understanding of how the ability of someone to resist dominant cultural oppression in many ways flows from how strong/healthy one’s sense of “manhood” or “womanhood” is. a strong argument can be made that people relate to one another based on their ability to identify with someone else along gender lines.

    I like Obama because he’s a black man and I can relate to his story. (i’m not 100% impressed with all of his policies…)

    i dare say many black woman relate MORE with Michelle than Obama because they can identify with her as a woman (not just a black person). That one’s easy. What really got me thinking was trying to explain how many black woman would vote for HRC over Obama. Well, that to me seems like there’s some type of gender identification going on…

    (which is why Obama is very smart to have Michelle speak for him every chance he gets)

  35. Rick

    “Well, that to me seems like there’s some type of gender identification going on…”

    …that transcends purely racial lines (is I meant to add)

  36. NMP

    “Now that I think about it, I know plenty of black women who support Hillary. It has absolutely nothing to do with the fact they think the Clintons are the Messiahs who have saved the black community — so that hypothesis, however tempting and seductive, doesn’t satisfactorily explain their behavior.”

    Rick,

    Sorry for the miscommunication, but my “Messiah” oberservation was in reference to poor Blacks, not Black women. I’ve acknowledged that there is gender identity in play, but I think it’s quite unusual, even wharped. By and large, Black women have NOT embraced the White feminist movement. Why have Black women chosen to form their own professional organizations and leagues if the solidarity or sense of shared experience is so great? There has never been a Black female buy-in to the groups like N.O.W. or the feminist movement as whole. As I said, I find this new found “kinship” quite peculiar.

  37. I wonder if black folks tend to identify with the Clintons because Bill was supposedly very poor when he was growing up. I think that him growing up in a poor town like Hope makes black folks think he knows how it feels to be black and poor.

    I feel like economics really does separate and/or connect us to one another.

  38. Rick

    “As I said, I find this new found “kinship” quite peculiar.” — NMP

    Peculiar to me too, NMP. Nice counter-argument in post 49 to my hypothesis about gender solidarity.

    Angie, you raise an interesting thought about black’s possible solidarity with Clinton based on class (based on Bill’s humble beginnings). I think there is some truth to that too…

    Class. Race. Gender.
    So many different angles. Part of what makes politics so interesting🙂

  39. NMP

    “I wonder if black folks tend to identify with the Clintons because Bill was supposedly very poor…”

    Angie,

    The operative word is “supposedly,” because substantial evidence is available that Clinton wasn’t poor at all. Perhaps poor by upper-middle class standards, but certainly not by the standards of po’ Black folks. His stepfather, while maybe an abusive drunk, owned a successful car dealership, and Bill Clinton himself drove a brand new convertible during high school. A lot of Black folks in Arkansas would have loved to be that type of poor. 🙂

  40. I think the solidarity with Clinton came from his being constantly attacked by the arch conservatives. I’ve been meaning to get around to writing an article about this…but in a nutshell we saw the same thing with O.J. Simpson. Here’s a guy that had nothing to do with black folks for many years and then suddenly he’s got the LAPD on him and he’s the new Huey Newton. It’s a knee jerk response to persecution from the white power structure. The sad thing is that Clinton pandered to the surburbanites and “Reagan Democrats” (google “Sista Souljah Moment”) in 1992 and again in 1996.

    Bill Clinton pushed polices that did real harm to working class people, and in that sense was no better than any Republican president, even the current one. Sometimes the enemy of your enemy is not much of a friend at all.

  41. Thanks for this message Skep…

    Her messages have always been very good…and I usually found myself agreeing with her. So I asked… & she agreed to join (still don’t know how I managed this…lol…). I felt like an NBA GM picking up a huge free-agent, lol.

    Her welcome post is here:

    http://mirroronamerica.blogspot.com/2007/05/new-blogger-meet-rikyrah.html

    I finally have enough co-bloggers….and I will be taking some down time…. a lot of down time eventually.

    I’ll be going out of town for some interviews later this month. I will be starting a serious grind pretty soon.

    I first contemplated ending the whole blog thing… but I might be able to keep it going. I want to keep it at least through the 2008 elections. As long as it won’t interfere with anything… I should be alright. I’m always worried about someone seeing some of the blog posts I have made though, lol. Especially when I apply for sensitive positions. Bush-ites are all over the damn place.

    But when I take a break, the blog will be in good hands.🙂

    Just passed 1000 posts…. a few days ago.

    Take care

  42. dblhelix

    rikyrah: I spent five years working in inner city schools – on the business end. Got out of it because it deflated my spirit.

    Wondering if you watched HBO’s The Wire/Season 4 (won’t be on BET for a while).

  43. “His stepfather, while maybe an abusive drunk, owned a successful car dealership, and Bill Clinton himself drove a brand new convertible during high school. A lot of Black folks in Arkansas would have loved to be that type of poor.” NMP

    My sister, I really do appreciate the insight that you bring. Thanks!

  44. Cliff

    Here is where we elevate our queens, while they look at others beating them down. They are probing the community with a high scale magnifying glass and seeing who is still acting as previously assigned to tend to business as usual of the desecration of the black women, on the contrary we have powerful think tanks such as “Skeptical Brotha” which elevate our sisters. Separation is occurring at a rapid pace now, manifesting the dichotomy of those who want to continue with the instructions of our enemy, and those who would like peace and contentment, edifying and being backed by a power queen.

    For Example, the sexually explicit actions of what would be a normally insignificant concert by R&B artist “Akon”, in Trinidad & Tobago, were put under a microscope, post Don Imus remarks. We have to be really careful about what we say and how we perform nowadays. With regard to our Brotha SB, I got nothing but love for his strategy to uplift the black woman. Particularly our sista’ Rikyrah.🙂

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