The Endorsement Speech

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Anne Kornblut wrote an interesting piece for the Washington Post’s Trail blog. I quote some of it below, but for me, what was more illuminating was what came after it. The comment section was filled with the bitterest Hillarycrat and GOP trolls ever. These people make it seem as if Obama supporters are delusional in believing that the brotha has a shot in the General Election.

Hat Tip: By Anne Kornblut, Washington Post

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, the most successful female presidential candidate in U.S. history, officially left the race on Saturday with a forceful promise to help elect Sen. Barack Obama — and a powerful declaration that, even in defeat, a gender barrier had been crossed.

Four days after Obama secured the delegates to win the Democratic nomination, Clinton gave him her unqualified endorsement, finally putting to rest questions about whether she would help unite the party for the general election. In generous and at times soaring terms, Clinton described her cause as united with Obama’s, saying that only electing him would achieve the goals of universal health care, a strong economy and the end of the war in Iraq.

“We may have started on separate journeys, but today our paths have merged,” Clinton said. She discouraged rehashing the long and divisive Democratic primary campaign, instead asking her supporters — some of whom, still resentful, booed when she mentioned her former rival during the speech — to “take our energy, our passion, our strength and to do all we can to help elect Barack Obama the next president of the United States.”

“When you hear people saying, or think to yourself, ‘if only’ or ‘what if,’ I say — please don’t go there,” Clinton said. “Every moment wasted looking back keeps us from moving forward.”

She continued: “Life is too short, time is too precious, and the stakes are too high to dwell on what might have been. We have to work together for what still can be. And that is why I will work my heart out to make sure that Sen. Obama is our next president, and I hope and pray that all of you will join me in that effort.”

The trolls were in rare form today on this blog post:

“Sorry Mrs. Clinton, this life long democrat will vote Republican for the first time ever. After your speech today, I gave a donation to John McCain. He has my vote as well.

Obama is wrong for this country and I won’t be part of that choice. He will lose. He deserves to lose. He’s an empty suit.”

Posted by: Pansycritter | June 7, 2008 7:32 PM

“Well, there’s one thing for sure: NO MORE RACE CARDS!!!! If/when the U.S. elects a black President, then thankfully no more cries of discrimination. Nominating and/or electing a black President speaks volumes – that effectively, there is no more discrimination against blacks. Finally, an end to the whining.”

Posted by: tellthetruthnow | June 7, 2008 7:32 PM

“Hopefully, some time soon, people will recognize Obama for what he is. They’ll look back and see his trail of crooked, biggoted friends; the nuance that leaves us wondering what his hope for us is; his socialists [sic] friends.”

“His 20 year comfort in isolation with all of the above should give answer to why he is spiritually devoted to Africa? (A continent of perpetual revolution, starvation, disease, and murder.) We should see now, before it’s too late, that what he prays to be liberated from is the nation our forefathers built to provide us with the opportunities that initiative and hard work provide. Even worse is that he prays for our liberation from the fruits of our labor in order for him to provide the desires of his brethren.”

Posted by: rpatoh | June 7, 2008 7:31 PM

“I supported Hillary. There is no way in jell [sic] am going to vote for Barrack. He’s a liar and closet racist. No way!!”

Posted by: Lou | June 7, 2008 7:29 PM

What are your thoughts about the speech and these posters reactions to it?

35 thoughts on “The Endorsement Speech

  1. TripLBee,

    Aside from the question of grammar, what was your take on the speech. Did she do what she needed to or did she give a green light to her base supporters, which none of them needed, to defect to McCain?

  2. She had to slowly move the crowd toward Barack. She did it well with the folks in the hall, we can only hope she did it well with the folks across the country.
    As to “tellthetruthnow”, so I’m a crooked, bigoted socialist. If all your side has is name-calling, this election is going to be easier then I thought.

  3. The trolls dont surprise me, the republicans have an interesting internet game. A lot of the same people posting on different sites pretending to be democrats or concerned.

    Most of those folks would have never of voted for Obama even if he was Will Smith and a glass of milk.

    I just think its cute reading the excuses people try to find for their bigotry, none of it is policy it’s all personal. And not even accurately personal.

    But about the speech, it was in her style and not too forced. I think she was sincere for the most part and as the wounds heal we will see a more unified Democratic party.

  4. The pure hate from the Hillary side is frightening. Let’s not be fooled – Dick Morris said Hillary has not released her delegates yet. She only “suspended” her campaign. So technically, she did not concede. Will this ever end? I do love Obama, but I am a realist when I say that Hillary Clinton LOST this race her own self. See my posting below.
    http://crosspolemics.wordpress.com/2008/06/06/hillarys-postmortem-she-ran-in-the-wrong-primary/

    Your site rocks by the way!! I’m a white boy from the South Side of Chicago who loves politics. I live near Obama and i went to the same High School as Five Mayors of Chicago – so it’s in me blood!

  5. It’s over. I refused to watch it. I am tivo’ing it from C-Span.

    She cannot be trusted. Under any circumstances.

    And Obama knows that.

    He’ll pretend otherwise, but he’s smart like that.

    I’ll continue to say that the hero of Tuesday night, outside of Barack Obama, was Jeffery Toobin.

    Up until he uttered ‘DERANGED NARCISSIST’, they weren’t telling the truth about the ugliness of her speech.

  6. The wingnuts take projection to a whole new level. They are constantly accusing folks of what they are and how they do. Murder? See Iraq. Ruining the country? See Bush/Cheney. Starvation? See colonial wars all across the world fueled by the concept of Manifest Destiny that they have been pushing since Columbus. Disease? See the mental illness in their words.

    It’s a shame that McCain, who has shown signs of actually having a conscience at times in his political career, will kowtow to the likes of these psychopaths.

  7. zeitgeist9000

    The middle part of her speech, which bordered on prose-poetry, was the best oration I’ve ever seen her do:

    “That’s why we need to help elect Barack Obama our president…. And that is why we must help elect Barack Obama our president…. And that is why we have to help elect Barack Obama our president…. And that is why we must help elect Barack Obama our president.”

    This was basically repeated four times in the middle of speech in the context of universal health care, energy independence, fiscal responsibility, middle-class strengthening and the Iraq War.

    So I don’t think this lady is playing is what I’m saying.

    SB, you’ve taken the most extreme comments you could find from Clinton supporters on a day when they would be most disappointed to try to undermine Clinton’s candidacy and frame her supporters as racist plutocrats or prejudiced hillbillies.

    You ain’t right.

    I think all the Hillary hatred that’s been going in full force since late 2006 like the Hillary nutcrackers and finally the “Bros before Hos” t-shirt underline the dichotomy of the primary: race was treated with kid gloves while sex was trammeled.

  8. tabt

    She said, “Suspend”, not concede. Therefore, she still controls her pledged delegates and, I think, has influence with the supers too, come convention time. She still has a lot of power and I hope she doesn’t use it to pressure Obama into making her the VP nominee.

    As far as her fanatical supporters, let them go. If they’re willing to vote for McCain, they were probably Republicans anyway. Ignore them, and the fear mongering that the media and others are trying to generate, and they will slither back to the party where they belong.

    Most Democrats will wind up voting Democratic in November.

  9. “Most Democrats will wind up voting Democratic in November.”

    That is not a given, and the concern trolls and republican trolls know it. So does Hilldog. Luckily, the Obama camp does too.

    The american electorate has proven time and time again they will vote short term emotion over long term interest. They are the political equivalent of payday loan market. Borrow today for an impulse buy, and pay out the nose tomorrow.

    The trick is to re-direct the given prejudices in a judo-like way to elect someone that most people will define by his appearance. In 2004, when the electorate were looking for a “war president”, Rove managed to spin things to elect a man who went AWOL from a champaigne unit. It shows that given the right strategy, you can indeed sell refrigerators to an eskimo-american.

  10. Rick

    First, I add my voice to the chorus congratulating Senator Obama on his achievement to win the Democratic nomination. When others said it couldn’t be done, he proved, “Yes…”

    I’ve been speechless on all of this since Tuesday. You see on the same day Senator Obama won the nomination, I also received a promotion. There were times when it didn’t look like it was going to happen. And yes, there were critics. Yes some of them looked and sounded like Obama’s nemesis –playing some of the same mind tricks. Yes, there were time when I was frustrated. But in the end, if you don’t give up. You can win. You will win. If you don’t give up.

    I cried when I got home, because there were so many other things going on atthe same time. A death in the family. Sickness. Friends, family, and yes the church…people trippin. Craziness at work. It took a long time for me to get promoted when I deserve it so long ago. But the message is, regardless of what is going on, be firm and don’t give up, and you can win. “Yes…”

    As far as Hillary’s speech goes, like rikyrah, I didn’t watch it. I wasn’t too much interested in what she had/has to say.

    As far as her supporters go: A good portion of the votes they cast for McCain will be offset by independents and moderate republicans who will send “thank you” votes to Obama for defeating the Clinton Machine and having the toughness to not be bullied into putting Hillary on the ticket. Obama would not get their vote if she were on the ticket. Obama would not get MY vote if she were on the ticket. Those posters can say or do what they want to do. It simply will not matter.

    There is a theme emerging. What people mean for harm can turn out to be really good. Even if it’s not clear at first, and hurt feelings are involved. If it came easy, the victory would not be as sweet in the end.

    “YES WE CAN”
    🙂

  11. Rick

    zeitgeist9000 wrote…
    “SB, you’ve taken the most extreme comments you could find from Clinton supporters on a day when they would be most disappointed to try to undermine Clinton’s candidacy and frame her supporters as racist plutocrats or prejudiced hillbillies.”

    …but she immediately applied the same tactic when she continued with…

    “think all the Hillary hatred that’s been going in full force since late 2006 like the Hillary nutcrackers and finally the “Bros before Hos” t-shirt”

    But, since feminists and womanists keep bringing up the issue of gender as an explanatory variable of why Hillary loss, I feel compelled to respond. Consider these controversial positions:

    In my opinion…
    * Hillary’s loss ironically validates that it’s actually OK — and America could relate to better — a woman who showed she is a WOMAN, and not a, cold, calculating, robotic machine.

    * Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine. That’s because they’ve seen the alternate — the FEMBOT model — categorically rejected in the democratic primary. They’ve seen her pretend to be warm, and people actually liked that.

    * In conclusion, Hillary’s loss is actually more liberating, not less liberating to women.

    Separately, to say men who don’t like Hillary only because they are mysogenists is so weak and doesn’t go beyond being an emotionally pacifying but sore-loser response…that ironically hurts women more than it helps women’s cause. Maureen Dowd has made the same exact point.

    Answer this question: She claims she wants all the American people (throw in Puerto Ricans who don’t even share full citizenship rights in the republic) to enjoy the liberties that she has.

    But what about this father who was arrested in a mall in Albany (steps away from NY’s capital) for wearing a “Give Peace a Chance” T-shirt in March 2003 right before the invasion? Does not charity begin at home…or steps away from your senate office doorsteps?

    http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/Northeast/03/04/iraq.usa.shirt.reut/index.html

    Did Hillary mean “liberties” for this man? If so, why did she not say anything? Why was she so silent? Is she a leader? Am I misogynist? Or do I just hate hypocrisy and crooks? I’d say the latter, but I’m biased.

    Rick

  12. Rick

    zeitgeist9000 wrote…
    “SB, you’ve taken the most extreme comments you could find from Clinton supporters on a day when they would be most disappointed to try to undermine Clinton’s candidacy and frame her supporters as racist plutocrats or prejudiced hillbillies.”

    …but she immediately applied the same tactic when she continued with…

    “think all the Hillary hatred that’s been going in full force since late 2006 like the Hillary nutcrackers and finally the “Bros before Hos” t-shirt”

    But, since feminists and womanists keep bringing up the issue of gender as an explanatory variable of why Hillary loss, I feel compelled to respond. Consider these controversial positions:

    In my opinion…
    * Hillary’s loss ironically validates that it’s actually OK — and America could relate to better — a woman who showed she is a WOMAN, and not a, cold, calculating, robotic machine.

    * Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine. That’s because they’ve seen the alternate — the FEMBOT model — categorically rejected in the democratic primary. They’ve seen her pretend to be warm, and people actually liked that.

    * In conclusion, Hillary’s loss is actually more liberating, not less liberating to women.

    Separately, to say men who don’t like Hillary only because they are mysogenists is so weak and doesn’t go beyond being an emotionally pacifying but sore-loser response…that ironically hurts women more than it helps women’s cause. Maureen Dowd has made the same exact point.

    Answer this question: She claims she wants all the American people (throw in Puerto Ricans who don’t even share full citizenship rights in the republic) to enjoy the liberties that she has.

    But what about the father who was arrested in a mall in Albany (steps away from NY’s capital) simple for wearing a “Give Peace a Chance” T-shirt on March 4, 2003 right before the invasion? Does not charity begin at home…or steps away from your senate office doorsteps?

    Did Hillary mean “liberties” for that man? If so, why did she not say anything? Why was she so silent? Is she a leader? Am I misogynist? Or do I just hate hypocrisy and crooks? I’d say the latter, but I’m biased.

    Rick

  13. BigSister

    All this reminds me of The Godfather with Obama as Al Pacino’s role moving to seize control of the family. Clinton made the smart politcal move. She struck the right tone, said everything just right, it’s the smart move. But Obama knows his enemies as well as his friends in and out of the family.

  14. “Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine. That’s because they’ve seen the alternate — the FEMBOT
    model — categorically rejected in the democratic primary. They’ve seen her pretend to be warm, and people actually liked that.” Rick

    Now, all of you know that I don’t have nothing for HC. But Rick, I have some questions and comments about your above statements.
    For one, it has been amazing how many times I have heard men, even gay men, say that HC acts like a “dike, a lesbian, a bulldagger, or any other stereotypical description for a homosexual woman.” Although I believe that HC has taken some of our (women’s) best attributes and used them as a negative, such as our ability to be persuasive, to be noticed, to be shrewd, to be calculating, to be resourceful, to be persistent, I think that she, along with many other executive women, are often labeled as a non feminine woman, a butch, if you will.

    “Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine.”
    What exactly do you mean by this? Are you implying that if a woman is not traditionally feminine, she is not being herself?
    Is it possible that some women are not as feminine as others, and they are truly being their natural selves, no faking, completely and innately themselves?
    I think that it is quite likely that HC was and is being herself. And I think that it is possible that herself is a lot less fem than other women. And I think that is okay.

    My issue with HC was not her lack of femininity. I would have been no more impressed with her if she wore a dress more than her pant suits, or if she had a sway in her hips that dripped with feminine energy.
    I dislike her because of her attitude of entitlement, her disrespect of Senator Obama and his thoughtful supporters, her arrogant certainty that she was going to walk into the White House without a hitch, and her coarse, rude, nasty approach that she took with her campaign.

    To me, HC’s attitude is what held her back from the White House. The feminists love to scream that it was a gender thing But I’m not buying it.
    HC lost because she ran a faulty campaign, full of flaws and miscalculated steps. She played the blame game, just because she didn’t play her A-game.
    To me, she showed the worst side of a woman. She played the lion and the lamb whenever it was convenient.
    And the truth is that glass ceiling that she talks about would not have been a possibility if she wasn’t married to one of the members of the good old boy club.

    Rick, if I’m misunderstanding your point, please clarify.

    Nothing but love,
    Angie

  15. **I’ve tried to post this comment a few times. If it doesn’t hit this time, perhaps it wasn’t meant to be posted. Here’s my last try.**

    “Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine. That’s because they’ve seen the alternate — the FEMBOT
    model — categorically rejected in the democratic primary. They’ve seen her pretend to be warm, and people actually liked that.” Rick

    Now, all of you know that I don’t have nothing for HC. But Rick, I have some questions and comments about your above statements.
    For one, it has been amazing how many times I have heard men, even gay men, say that HC acts like a “dike, a lesbian, a bulldagger, or any other stereotypical description for a homosexual woman.” Although I believe that HC has taken some of our (women’s) best attributes and used them as a negative, such as our ability to be persuasive, to be noticed, to be shrewd, to be calculating, to be resourceful, to be persistent, I think that she, along with many other executive women, are often labeled as a non feminine woman, a butch, if you will.

    “Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine.”
    What exactly do you mean by this? Are you implying that if a woman is not traditionally feminine, she is not being herself?
    Is it possible that some women are not as feminine as others, and they are truly being their natural selves, no faking, completely and innately themselves?
    I think that it is quite likely that HC was and is being herself. And I think that it is possible that herself is a lot less fem than other women. And I think that is okay.

    My issue with HC was not her lack of femininity. I would have been no more impressed with her if she wore a dress more than her pant suits, or if she had a sway in her hips that dripped with feminine energy.
    I dislike her because of her attitude of entitlement, her disrespect of Senator Obama and his thoughtful supporters, her arrogant certainty that she was going to walk into the White House without a hitch, and her coarse, rude, nasty approach that she took with her campaign.

    To me, HC’s attitude is what held her back from the White House. The feminists love to scream that it was a gender thing But I’m not buying it.
    HC lost because she ran a faulty campaign, full of flaws and miscalculated steps. She played the blame game, just because she didn’t play her A-game.
    To me, she showed the worst side of a woman. She played the lion and the lamb whenever it was convenient.
    And the truth is that glass ceiling that she talks about would not have been a possibility if she wasn’t married to one of the members of the good old boy club.

    Rick, if I’m misunderstanding your point, please clarify.

    Nothing but love,
    Angie

  16. Jessica

    Saying that Hillary isn’t really a woman is like saying that Obama isn’t really a black guy. I’ve heard both comments. If nothing else – I do believe that these narrow definitions have been stretched a little bit. I do believe that the primary season has pushed us forward in breaking down stereotypes. It has probably strengthened a few old ones and created a few new ones as well. On balance- I still think that we are ahead. Maybe I’m just a glass half full kind of person.

  17. TripLBee

    Skep,

    I’ve been away for a few days and am just getting around to responding to you. Listen, I am no fan of Hillary Clinton’s but I try to be fair. She gave an excellent speech. I liked the way she tied together the struggles of marginalized people–women, black folks, gays, Latinos, etc. She got back to the liberal roots that she fertilized in the 60s and 70s. She did appear strained when she mentioned Obama’s name, but she made it unambiguously clear that he was the guy to vote for. I think she could have been a bit more forceful, but the speech was the polar opposite of her performance last Tuesday. Even though I am long past the point of trusting her, I’m giving her credit for this speech. What do you think?

  18. Rick

    I wrote:
    “Hillary’s loss makes it possible for future woman politicians to be themselves. To be feminine.”

    Hmmm…I can see how that could be interpreted in a number of different ways. To clarify, a couple of events stand out to me as far as Hillary doing things to “prove” that she could be as tough as as her male counterparts.

    *her support for the war
    *her refusal to apologize
    *her speech I listened to which exclaimed that the U.S. must be willing to “pay any price” to defend Israel
    *her provocative challenging Obama to the Lincoln-style debates…”mano to mano”
    * statements by her surrogates that she had more ___ than Obama. (fill in the blanks. HER campaign’s message/words NOT mine)

    I bring this up to say that if I were a woman candidate looking at this — and I am not:

    My impression is that
    *I could vote against belligerance and it’s ok
    *I could apologize and it’s ok
    * I could articulate what I feel are the interests of my country, and allies, without making testosterine-charged fanatic statements
    * I could challenge Obama to a civil debate and dialogue without calling up images of a celebrity cage death match.

    Am I wrong? Perhaps. Perhaps not. But that’s how I feel about it…

  19. Jessica

    Rick,

    I know exactly what you’re saying, but you are digging a hole. You sound like a very nice person but your view is littered with preconceptions and a narrow definition of who women are. At the risk of sounding sassy- we are all very different, you know?

    I must go one record and say (and not as a Hillary fan by any stretch) that:

    I do not believe that Hillary had to “prove” to be as tough as a man. She is tougher than many men.

    Many women support or have supported the war.

    Many women refuse to apologize (that makes me laugh. I could tell a story or two).

    Many women have firm beliefs about many things including foreign policy.

    More balls than Obama? That kind of sexism should have been shut down. That’s just dumb. Double standard in being able to us gender in this way.

    I think that everything that you witnessed is about Hillary Clinton being Hillary Clinton and has so little to do with her gender at this point. She cried for goodness sakes!

    You could probably make a feminist/ post feminist examination of how a woman born in 1947 ended up as “Hillary Clinton”.

    She’s come a long way baby?

  20. Rick

    Jessica, it is clear that all women are not the same. Some women are tougher than any man. Some women never apologize. Some women support the war. All of this I know.

    My point was that in a still male dominated world of politics, I believe Hillary took positions that were designed for her not to look “weak, not because she necessarily believed in such positions. It was only when that strategy did not appear to be working did she shift gears and attempt to show a “softer” side, which I also took to be deliberate.

    Yes she cried, exactly as you mentioned, and she also WON the very next day in New Hampshire. My takeaway is that I believe that suggests a woman candidate who comes across as nuturing can win, as opposed to that perception being an automatic liability or being viewed as something negative.

    By the way, it’s ok if you don’t agree with me. I’m here to exchange ideas…

  21. Jessica

    At the risk of dominating the blog to converse with you- Hillary’s tears won the vote of a certain type of woman who was attracted to that sort of thing. I believe that a different woman, either nurturing or not, could appeal to voters for similar reasons or completely different reasons. I do not think that the public is necessarily looking for one set of traits- the same set of traits from one election to the next. We have seen this with men and I can’t imagine why it would be different for women. There probably are common denominators- presidential qualities, but they seem to shift and evolve.

    I guess that you may be saying that to your surprise- traits that are commonly viewed as being female were excepted and not seen as a liability. The real test would be to see if a man with the same traits would be accepted.

    One step at a time.

    I also think that almost everything about HRC is contrived.

  22. Imhotep

    I am amazed vitriolic statements. I ‘ve been on Yahoo Answers as well and it’s more of the same. Never rational, or even accurate, they just hate the idea of a African American as president. No matter what Bush did or didn’t do, no matter that McSnap clearly is at a loss in undersatanding anything that relates to the needs of middle class (white) America or reality for that matter. McSnap defines what is and isn’t important and then proceeds. No matter that the facts seem totally opposed to his statements.
    What makes me nervous is the ease BO seems to be moving thru all of this. It’s almost like the powers that be want him in, only so when the “chickens come home to roost” the brother will have to deal with it, and then they can blame the state of the US on him (much like recent movies, when the earth is facing certain destruction, or alien attack Morgan Freeman is always the president.) Make no mistake, even as more and more is being revealed about the criminality of the present administration, nothing seems to register on the populace at large. They STILL think Obama is a secret Muslim, that he’s a Black Supremist, because of the Wright statements, he’ an elitist, whatever FIX News spews they bite hard on it hook, line and sinker.
    But Black folks know their true motivations… A Black President represents the beginning of the end of White domination. No doubt its not totally eradicated, far from it. But BO is empowering peoples minds. The impossible is possible. How many times have we said when “Hell freezes over” or “When there’s a Black president”. Well hell is freezing my Brother’s and Sisters and the Devils don’t like it.

  23. Rick

    “I guess that you may be saying that to your surprise- traits that are commonly viewed as being female were excepted and not seen as a liability. The real test would be to see if a man with the same traits would be accepted.”

    No, what I said was that if a woman candidate in the future wants to demonstrate a more nuturing side, she’s more ‘liberated’ to do so in light of Hillary’s failed campaign. I never said I was surprised.

  24. Rick

    “The real test would be to see if a man with the same traits would be accepted.

    One step at a time.” — Jessica

    This misunderstanding I’ve had with you and Angie on this topic is because I mis-used buzzwords words like “feminine”, while seemingly making broad comparisons between male, females. My central argument has nothing to do with a person’s gender per se. “Nuturing” isn’t the right word either.

    “Robotic” vs “Non-robotic” although still not perfect, come closer to what I’m trying to say.

    I don’t see the ‘robotic’ Hillary Clinton who ran ‘most’ of the 2007/2008 campaign ever winning the presidency. This is not specific to women.

    I don’t think the ‘robotic’ Al Gore of 2000 — smart, intelligent, but also mechanical as he was then — ever resonating either. (Now I hear you saying he was cheated, and I agree, but it should have been a landslide). And it would have been had the Al Gore who gave the touching concession speech — the ‘man’ who opened up a little that evening — been the same person to show up through out the 2000 campaign. For one evening he stopped being the walking collection of statistics, facts and figures, and actually spoke to the American people. The speech was described in the press as being “one of the most exemplary speeches for years to come.”

    All of this is BS right? Hmmm…if Obama wins this year, it will mean America will have had presidents from 1992-2012 who had very little experience coming into office, but who were able to connect with the American people. The robotics — male or female version — isn’t resonating. Jay-Z would say something like, “Switch up your flow your *ish is garbage. What you trying to kick, knowledge?”

    One last time: It’s ok to show a little personality. It’s ok. Male and females. We’ve all been liberated (to a greater, not total, degree).

    Now you

  25. Angie-Nuvision

    Rick, I gotcha. This last explanation was much more clear. In fact, I agree with your analysis regarding Gore and Clinton.
    And I also agree that both of these candidates lacked in possessing a real, warm, human, down to earth quality during their campaigns.

    I guess the reason why your initial comment stood out was because of those buzz words, as you put it.

    As a young woman, I’ve been trying hard to find the balance in my profession. If I smile too much, indicate that I’m willing to compromise my positions, be warm and friendly, show a little leg and breast, then the men that I work with, old and young, white or black, try to push up on me or they try to treat me like I’m a “little woman”, non deserving of full respect.
    And if you are firm, less than friendly, a little stand offish, and dress in a A-sexual form, then, you are not liked, thought of as a bitch or butch (take your pick), or just plain undesirable.

    Now grant it, I’m young. And I’m still learning about myself and how others perceive me. And I’m also learning to be myself and to flow in a way that makes me comfortable.
    And for me that means that I will be friendly, I will smile, I will be willing to compromise, I will be cute **smile**, and I will be firm when I need to be. Because that’s me… That’s how my folks raised me to be…
    Sometimes I get the response that I hope for, and sometimes I don’t. But whatever the case, I tap into the strength that God has given to me and ask Him to guide me on how to deal with it.
    Plus, I’m not the kind of woman that get freaked out when a man tries to holla. Perhaps this is a little stereo typical of me to say, but “men will be men.” And I’m okay with that.
    I happen to like them. **LOL!**

    Peace,
    Angela

  26. RisingTide

    Thanks Rick for clarifying. Kindly ignore anyone flaming your original statements, as they’re probably being misread, which gets peoples nerves on fire.

  27. RisingTide

    Everyone,

    Even people who don’t like Hillary’s politics (like Markos), say that she is warm and friendly in person. Still ruthless, but never pointlessly ruthless.

    She came across like shit on the camera. But that don’t mean that she’s inhuman (not that most were saying she was, mind)

  28. Rick

    Rising Tide,

    It’s cool. I sort of knew what I was getting into🙂

    But, the ideas that Angie shared with us this morning are exactly those that should continue to be solicited and brought to the forefront of America’s conscious level…instead of being left in the background pretending that such issues don’t exist.

    How else do we get to know about the issues that women and men face unless we talk about them?

    You are not alone, sista Angie. But together, if we look for ways to find common ground, our proud history suggests we can overcome anything…

  29. Jessica

    I get it. It was hot, hot, hot in NYC and I was busting your chops (very half-heartedly), like I would a family member. Just passing time really. As I said before- you seem like a very nice person and you were a prince to continue. I need air conditioning- I wrote except rather than accept. SHeesh!

    Peace.

  30. Angie

    “Kindly ignore anyone flaming your original statements, as they’re probably being misread, which gets peoples nerves on fire.” RT

    Ummm… I wasn’t flaming anyone, especially Rick. I was merely having a conversation. And sometimes when conversing, there are times when clarification is needed, and times that you don’t completely agree. This is probably the one time that I questioned Rick on one of his comments. And I respecthim for being the gentleman that he is and answering me with respect.

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