Godfather of Soul hasn’t been buried

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By KATRINA A. GOGGINS, Associated Press Writer 1/9/06

The body of soul singer James Brown has yet to be buried as attorneys and his children work to settle issues surrounding his estate, including where he will be laid to rest.

For now, his body lies in a sealed casket in his home on Beech Island, said Charles Reid, manager of the C.A. Reid Funeral Home in Augusta, Ga., which handled the services.

Brown died of heart failure Dec. 25 at age 73. His will has yet to be filed, said Buddy Dallas, an attorney for the singer.

The room where Brown’s body lies is being kept at a controlled temperature, and security guards keep watch, Reid said.

The funeral home delivered Brown’s body after services Dec. 30, Reid said.

Brown’s home has been locked since hours after his death to protect his memorabilia, furnishing, clothes and other personal items, Dallas said.

Tomi Rae Hynie, Brown’s partner, said shortly after his death that she encountered locked gates as she tried to get into the home she says she shared with the singer and their 5-year-old son.

If anybody in your family ever used the term “Nigga S@#t”, this is what they were referring to.  Al Sharpton loved the Godfather so much that he assumed control of his funeral and hogged the spotlight. Too bad he couldn’t get the Godfather buried properly. Now, he wants to run for President?

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Al Sharpton considering 2008 bid

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By The Associated Press Tue Jan 9, 8:01 AM ET

Civil rights activist Al Sharpton said Monday he is seriously considering a run for president. “I don’t hear any reason not to,” Sharpton, 52, said in an interview during an urban affairs conference sponsored by another civil rights leader, the Rev. Jesse Jackson.

“If we’re talking about the urban agenda, can you tell me anybody else in the field who’s representing that right now?” Sharpton asked. “We clearly have a reason to run, and whether we do it or not we’ll see over the next couple of months.”

Sharpton mounted a long-shot bid for the White House in 2004, in which his wit and fiery denunciation of President Bush often enlivened Democratic primary debates. He dropped out of the race after losing several state primaries and endorsed the eventual nominee, Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry.

Despite widespread interest in the likely candidacy of another influential black Democrat, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama (news, bio, voting record), Sharpton said he’s heard little substantive discussion of issues that might influence his decision about running.

“Right now we’re hearing a lot of media razzle dazzle,” Sharpton said. “I’m not hearing a lot of meat, or a lot of content. I think when the meat hits the fire, we’ll find out if it’s just fat or if there’s some real meat there.”